Outcomes by birth setting and caregiver for low risk women in Indonesia: a systematic literature review

Care for women during pregnancy, labour, birth and the postpartum period is essential to reducing maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, however the ideal place and organisation of care provision has not been established. The World Health Organization recommends a two-tier maternity care system involving first-level care in community facilities, with backup obstetric hospital care. However, evidence from high-income countries is increasingly showing benefits for low risk women birthing outside of hospital with skilled birth assistance and access to backup care, including lower rates of intervention. Indonesia is a lower middle-income country with a network of village based midwives who attend births at homes, clinics and hospitals, and has reduced mortality rates in recent decades while maintaining largely low rates of intervention. However, the country has not met its neonatal or maternal mortality reduction goals, and it is unclear whether greater improvements could be made if all women birthed in hospital.
 
 

Citation

Hodgkin, K, Joshy, G, Browne, J et al 2019, 'Outcomes by birth setting and caregiver for low risk women in Indonesia: a systematic literature review', Reproductive Health, vol. 16, no. 67, pp. 1-12.

ANU Gender Institute member author
Emeritus Professor Terence H Hull
 
Year
2019
 
AttachmentSize
PDF icon Terence H Hull Reproductive Health.pdf1.14 MB

Audience

Public

Network

ANU, Gender Institute

Date posted

Wednesday, 8 April 2020

Updated:  7 November 2012/Responsible Officer:  Convenor, Gender Institute/Page Contact:  Web manager, Gender Institute