Skip navigation
The Australian National University

ARC success for Gender Institute members

Congratulations to Gender Institute members who have been awarded Australian Research Council (ARC) funding, announced this week. The ANU won funding of more than $43 million for 91 proposals. 

Associate Professor line d'Orgeville, from the ANU Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre (AITC) at Mount Stromlo, along with colleagues Associate Professor Francois Rigaut, Associate Professor Robert Sharp, Associate Professor Andrew Lambert, Dr Stuart Ryder, Dr Michael Goodwin, Dr James Mason, Dr Antonin Bouchez, Hon. Professor Yue Gao, won a $502,000 Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities grant to help build a new laser system for the first Australian laser guide star. The laser guide star system will be crucial for civil and defence telescopes such as the new Giant Magellan Telescope under construction in Chile, as well as systems to be used to track debris in space.

Associate Professor Sharon Bessell, Director of Research at the Crawford School of Public Policy, won a $531,000 Discovery Project grant to help find ways to alleviate child poverty in Indonesia. However, she said the research would have global implications.

Professor Mahananda Dasgupta, from the Department of Nuclear Physics, along with colleagues Dr Edward Simpson, Professor Martin Freer and Professor Antonio Moro, won a $643,500 Discovery Project grant for a project that aims to pin down cluster transfer dynamics and develop models combining quantum coherence and energy dissipation, using Australia’s exotic beam capability. 

Dr Elizabeth Williams, also from the Department of Nuclear Physics, along with colleagues Professor David Hinde and Professor Christoph Duellmann, won a $658,500 Discovery Project grant for a project that aims to measure properties, probabilities and timescales of competing quasifission processes, by combining Australian accelerator and detector capabilities with exotic radioactive targets.

Professor Miranda Stewart, from the Tax and Transfer Policy Institute, Crawford School of Public Policy, along with colleague Dr Alfred Tran, won a $391,500 Discovery Project grant to evaluate the effectiveness of measures to combat tax avoidance by multinational enterprises. 

Associate Professor Juliet Pietsch, from the School of Politics and International Relations, Research School of Social Sciences, along with colleagues Professor James Raymer, Dr Hanlin Shang, Dr Arkadiusz Wiśniowski and Professor Guy Abel, won a $409,500 Discovery Project grant to develop statistical models of population movements in the Asia-Pacific region to harmonise, correct for errors and estimate annual flows by origin, destination, age and sex.

Dr Michelle Antoinette, from the School of Art, has won a $364,124 Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to understand new forms of public participation in Asia's arts and culture sectors, with new interest in public participation in art and museum initiatives.

Dr Kathryn Henne, from the School of Regulation and Global Governance (RegNet), has won a $357,000 Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to discover how governance, science and society inform the design and implementation of traumatic brain injury interventions.

Dr Caroline Schuster, from the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, has won a $352,019 Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to broaden and re-theorise economic definitions of insurance through ethnographic methodologies and feminist studies of finance.

Dr Christine Wallace has won a $358,227  Discovery Early Career Researcher Award to study the desirability of diplomatic interventions and practices to achieve ‘smart power’ results in an era where ‘hard power’ military intervention is often a disproportionately large, reflex response to global security threats.

Read more here. The full ARC grants announcement can be found here.

Updated:  7 November, 2012/Responsible Officer:  Convenor, Gender Institute/Page Contact:  Web manager, Gender Institute