Making the invisible, visible

Policy Forum

Shedding light on the gendered dimensions of poverty.

Episode 1: In episode one, Sharon Bessell joins Policy Forum to discuss the limitations of the international poverty line and what new research has revealed about the gendered, multidimensional nature of poverty.

It has been 20 years since the Millennium Development Goals were first conceptualised, and in that time a significant number of people have been lifted out of poverty. But with poverty defined narrowly, using household income alone, does that provide a true picture of global poverty at the individual level? For over a decade, researchers from Crawford School of Public Policy have been working on an ambitious project to redefine how poverty is measured, taking an innovative, rights-based and people-centred approach. This research, now ongoing through the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project, didn’t just assess how many people are poor, but rather how they experience poverty.



Episode 2: In episode two, Janet Hunt and Sharon Bessell join Policy Forum to get behind the data from the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty project, and discuss what this tells us about the gendered dimensions of poverty.

For 12 years, researchers from Crawford School of Public Policy have been working on an ambitious project to redefine how poverty is measured. Now known as the Individual Measure of Multidimensional Poverty (IMMP) project, this research has revealed some insightful information about patterns of poverty, particularly in regards to gender. So how do women experience poverty differently from men? And what does this mean for policymakers involved in the global mission to eradicate poverty? 

Updated:  7 November 2012/Responsible Officer:  Convenor, Gender Institute/Page Contact:  Web manager, Gender Institute